I rarely pay attention to celebrity gossip and the daily news about Hollywood marriages and divorce. The media seems interested and based on the interest of a good number of people it seems warranted by our culture’s preoccupation with the private lives of the rich and famous.

images This is why I was so surprised that I ended up reading the story of the divorce of Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore. I would hardly have known they were married in the first place if so much attention had not be given to Demi Moore and Bruce Willis, her previous husband. Moore, for the record, is 49 years old while Ashton Kutcher is only 33. I suppose this in itself caught the attention of many when they married. This really was an older woman-younger man marriage. Would it work? How does it work? Curiosity about the bizarre and unusual reigns in pop culture.

Well, now that this famous couple is breaking up who actually cares? I don’t care I can assure you. But there was the story in my daily copy of USA Today. Nine times our of ten I would have skipped it. But for some odd reason I read it. I learned about Moore’s three children: Rumer (23), Scout (20) and Tallulah (17). (I did not come up with these names I assure you!) All three of Moore’s children have Bruce Willis for their father. But Ashton Kutcher said he loved all three children. What a strange world the children of these celebrities grow up in.

Demi Moore said of her breakup, “It is with great sadness and a heavy heart that I have decided to end my six-year marriage.” Really? Six years? It is hard to believe it lasted that long given the way their romance unfolded in the first place.

I thought Ashton Kutcher actually offered a rather insightful statement (in a simplistic way) when he said: “I will forever cherish the time I spent with Demi. Marriage is one of the most difficult things in all the world and unfortunately sometimes they fail.” You think? Wow, knock me over with insight. Marriage is difficult. Marriages fail.

How is it that we have celebrated these celebrity marriages and then followed their routine divorces so openly in our culture? And how many people really believe that “marriage is (really) difficult” to nurture and preserve? My guess is that the answer to this last question is “most people,” at least most people who have remained married long enough to endure the hardships that all couples eventually face. After all, we marry “for better or for worse.” Or at least we used to do that. 

The truth is marriage is almost impossible without love and most of those who talk about love have no idea what it really is.