For My Father For My Father is “a transcendent and powerful film” says critic Eric Alterman on The Huffington Post. I have to agree. I cannot remember seeing a film that deals with the Israeli/Palestinian struggle that so powerfully moves the mind and heart at the same time. It is not an accident that this Israeli film won seven awards within Israel. Raymond Murray, another professional film critic, calls it “Gripping yet sensitive . . . . warmly humanistic.” This is an understatement.

Terek, a Palestinian forced on a suicide mission in Tel Aviv to redeem his father's honor, is given a second chance when the fuse on his explosive vest fails to detonate.  Forced to spend the weekend in Tel Aviv awaiting its repair, Terek must live amongst the people he was planning to kill.  To his surprise he connects with several Israelis on the outskirts of society, including the beautiful Keren, who has cut off contact with her Orthodox family and upbringing.  With nothing to lose, Terek and Keren open up to one another, and an unlikely love blooms between two isolated and damaged individuals, raised to be enemies.

However, with the deadly load of explosives still strapped to him, he must spend 48 hours in the city, caught between the men that sent him—who can blow up his bomb remotely, the Israeli police patrolling the streets and his new-found companions. Spending this time with Keren and his new friends, Terek discovers the spark of life returning to fill his soul, but when the weekend ends, Terek must make the decision of his life.

For My Father is a presentation of Film Movement, a first-run, award winning company for independent films that almost never get shown on America cinema screens. You can subscribe to Film Movement and get a new film each month. I get mine at the public library. More than half of the ones I see are superb films. It is simply too bad that the American public does not see films like this one. I suppose it would be too much to ask Hollywood, at least in its present state, to produce such a serious and thought-provoking film.